Piriodo

ピリオド (Piriodo) · Period

In:
[Album] Kimi to Boku no Michi – track 2

The first thing about Piriodo that caught my attention was how the song becomes more intense or stirring in the chorus. I took a liking to Piriodo in a similar way to how I took a liking to Anata ni Suki to Iwaretai. As I translated this song and learned the meaning of its lyrics, I came to like it even more.

 

English

Growing up means something will be slowly lost
At some point in time, I started to think this in the corner of my heart

If it is fate that I cannot be with you
A life like that would be the same as not having a life; this thought crossed my mind at times

Even if you don’t love me for what I am, even if you don’t love me for what I can give you1
I smile more often now than before I met you
Even if you don’t love me for what I am, even if you don’t love me for what I can give you
It was you who taught me the joy of trusting another person

Did you already know the destination of happiness?
My fingertips that you hold are hiding true loneliness2

I vow to never see you again and to stay away from you
But these words are empty because I know that we aren’t just two people

If your love for what I am is a lie, if your love for what I can give is a lie
My heart would hurt so much but I’d have no wounds on my body
If your love for what I am is a lie, if your love for what I can give is a lie
I will never know the sadness of loving someone or the strength of breaking up3

We followed a long winding road and didn’t arrive anywhere
But everything I did with you was not meaningless
Not a single thing was meaningless

Even if you don’t love me for what I am, even if you don’t love me for what I can give you
I smile more often now than before I met you
Even if you don’t love me for what I am, even if you don’t love me for what I can give you
It was you who taught me the joy of trusting another person

It was you who taught me the joy of trusting another person

 

Translation notes

1.

The Japanese lyrics use “愛 (ai)” and “恋 (koi)”. While both of these words can be translated as “love” in English, each one implies a different kind of love. Based on the description in Wikipedia, the difference is that “愛(ai)” is selfless while “恋 (koi)” is selfish. To elaborate along my understanding of the difference, “爱愛(ai)” is to love for the sake of the person or thing being loved whereas “恋 (koi)” is to love with a desire to receive something in return. I think an English song that comes close to making this distinction is Love Me for What I Am by Lobo.

In an attempt to make this distinction in my English translation, I chose to describe “愛 (ai)” as “love for what I am” and “恋 (koi)” as “love for what I can give”. I chose to translate it as how the listener loves the singer because the rest of the song suggests that the singer knows how she loves the listener. So I think the singer is speculating about how the listener loves her.

For all I know, it may be that Oku Hanako did not intend to differentiate between the two different types of love. Perhaps she wanted to repeat the statement and decided to use “愛 (ai)” and “恋 (koi)” for variety.

2.

In this line, the Japanese lyrics and the Chinese translation do not explicitly say whose fingertips are being held by whom. My guess is that it is the singer’s fingertips being held by the listener because if the listener knew “the destination of happiness” then the listener could be guiding the singer while holding her hand. Besides that, the singer mentions how she has changed for the better as a result of meeting the listener, and “true loneliness” could be one thing about the singer that did not change.

3.

The phrase “the strength of breaking up” sounded weird to me at first, most likely because I have never encountered it before. The Japanese lyrics use “強さ (tsuyosa)” which means “strength”. The Chinese translation uses “坚强” which literally means “strong” and can mean “strength” in the right context, such as here. I think the intended meaning of “the strength of breaking up” could be how big the impact of a breakup is on the people involved, or that the singer becomes stronger due to the breakup.

 

I chose past and present tenses in my translation to show that the singer and the listener are at the point just before breaking up. This suggests that the singer feels “true loneliness” (translation note 2) because she knows that the breakup is going to happen. The lyrics are an expression of the singer’s thoughts on the relationship. Through the lyrics, we learn that the relationship helped the singer grow and that it means so much to her that she doesn’t want it to end. I like to think that the title uses two meanings of period. One meaning is “length of time” that refers to the enjoyable time that the singer and listener spent together. The other meaning is “full stop”, as in the punctuation mark. As the relationship is about to end and it is implied that the two people will not be able to reunite, the title could be interpreted as the absolute end of the relationship.

 

Simplified Chinese

成长 便是会渐渐失去什么
在心的角落 何时开始这么想着

无法和你在一起 若这是命运
这样的人生和没有一样 也有这么想过

就算不是爱 也不是恋
与你相遇的我 比以前更长带着笑
就算不是爱 也不是恋
相信人的喜悦 是你教会了我

幸福的目的地 你 已经知道了吗
牵起的指尖 隐藏着真正的寂寞

发誓不再见你 远离你
就连这些话语都无效地 也知道我们不只2个人

若是虚伪的爱 若是虚伪的恋
心如此地痛 却没有满身伤痕吗
若是虚伪的爱 若是虚伪的恋
爱人的悲伤 放手的坚强都不懂得

我俩绕了远路 没有到达任何地方
但与你的每件事 都不是无谓
一件无谓的事都没有

就算不是爱 也不是恋
与你相遇的我 比以前更长带着笑
就算不是爱 也不是恋
相信人的喜悦 是你教会了我

相信人的喜悦 是你教会了我

Advertisements

7 comments

    • Edward

      What are you wondering about? Is it about the difference between “爱 (ai)” and “恋 (koi)”? This is just my take on it and I wouldn’t be surprised if someone comes up with better expressions to show the difference. As for the alleged plagiarism of the musical intro, I vaguely recall seeing a comment to that effect on Thoughts on Oku Hanako, though I don’t remember which post I saw it in. Which song was it similar to again?

      Liked by 1 person

  1. tPenguinLTG

    It’s always tough translating 愛 / ai and 恋 / koi when they’re in the same line, and I think the way you translated it is a good way to do it for this song. I wonder if she included it to encompass both sides of love, to make it more complete.

    By the way, I want to point out that Japanese uses the traditional character 愛 instead of the simplified character 爱. When Japanese kanji was developed, the simplified character set didn’t exist yet, so most of the characters were taken from the traditional set. Over time, many Japanese characters were simplified, although differently than the Chinese simplified their characters. As a result, kanji became a mix of traditional characters, characters that look like they come from the Chinese simplified set, and characters that are unique to kanji.

    Like

    • Edward

      Thanks for pointing out my mistake with 愛. I forgot that they were different characters because they look similar when presented in a small font size. Also, thank you for sharing the link to the discussion of the alleged plagiarism.

      Like

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s